serafu:

image

this is legitimately the best headline i have ever read in my entire life 

(via olsnaggletooth)

2 months ago | 96467 notes | Lin

megadorman:

lavendertintedreflektor:

growlbeast:

painted-bees:

Sak Yant or Yantra Tattooing are  believed to give the wearer magic powers associated with healing, luck, strength, and protection against evil.

You can get these here in thailand by a monk, they look beautiful but I’d never recommend it. Essentially, you’re making a pact with a spirit to protect you in exchange for sacrificing an activity or habit you may have previously enjoyed (the monk decides what this is, not you). These tattoos are contracts. 
 Breaking your side of the bargain may encourage the spirit to ‘punish’ you, and these contracts are not easily voided. 

Reblogging for the informative caption. A lot of young people want things like this to be cool hipster fucks and they entirely disrespect the meaning behind these ceremonies

even though i personally dont believe in spirits or that stuff, i still believe that you shouldnt appropriate something this serious and important from their culture just to look “cool”

This this this.

(Source: gn-a, via mellymayday)

2 months ago | 83618 notes |

(Source: flickr.com, via vidinhadegauche)

6 months ago | 115616 notes |

humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the saddest moment of your life?"
"When I turned myself into the FBI at the age of 21. I’d committed a stupid crime, and I’d never been arrested before, so I was hiding from the cops. But then they started calling my mom. And she called and asked me to turn myself in. And I had to, cause it was my mom."

6 months ago | 5972 notes |

viskuse:

this video is so cute ???

9 months ago | 66386 notes |

faux-tographia:

lomographicsociety:

A Photographer Shoots His Autistic Son’s Universe for a Photography Project

The photographer Thimothy Archibald shares with us his interesting and moving project. In his series ‘Echolilia’, Archibald explores his relationship with his autistic son Elijah.

He started to photograph Elijah when he was only 5. However, back then, Archibald’s goal was nothing but sheer documentation. Elijah, who suffers from autism, was socially withdrawn, obsessed with mechanical objects, and had a ritual need for repetition. Archibald photographed his son and showed the pictures to different behavioral specialists who confirmed that he was on the autistic spectrum. 

This is so wonderful and beautiful

(via emissary-of-busu-deactivated201)

9 months ago | 27668 notes |

buildabitchworkshop:

is that the tardis

(Source: 103312, via a-scanner-dorkly)

9 months ago | 158421 notes |

heymonster:

the worst.

(via emissary-of-busu-deactivated201)

9 months ago | 28843 notes |

(Source: captainlumberjackduck, via falvie)

9 months ago | 24074 notes |

what’s the difference, anyway?

(via interwar)

11 months ago | 259097 notes |